Welcome to the Journal of Nutrient Management magazine, brought to you by the publisher of Hoard’s Dairyman and Hay & Forage Grower magazines

Soil and plant potassium (K) levels have frequently come up at meetings and in conversations with concern for declining soil K levels in the Northeast

The words “legislation” and “effective” are not often viewed as synonymous, especially between the political mules and elephants

The availability and price of urea have made it a popular fertilizer choice for many different crops, including forage grasses

Using livestock manure at appropriate rates on crop fields offers many advantages to the user, the soil and society

Injecting manure into tilled fields or after an annual crop has been harvested is a common practice. Doing the same into a perennial forage hayfield has been viewed as more problematic

I’ve shifted the focus of my nutrition talks and meetings from discussing ways to boost production or gains to that of improving feed conversion

Legumes improve forage quality and reduce nitrogen inputs in a pasture-based system. Grazing-based livestock producers frequently overseed cool-season grass pastures with legumes

Investing in fertilizer to enhance the growth of native grass pastures and hayfields has long been theorized as a questionable practice

Abby Bauer is the editor of Journal of Nutrient Management

When people talk about sustainability, they often refer to the term “carbon footprint.” However, there is more to the sustainability story than greenhouse gases

With each passing year, expectations continue to be placed on dairy producers across the country with a focal point being on-farm environmental practices

Nutrient application often ends up in the hot seat being blamed for impairing water quality

The author, a former dairy farmer, is currently a research assistant with the ag and biosystems engineering department at Iowa State University.Researchers at Oregon State University found biochar to

Think that all manure is basically the same? Think again. “There’s a lot of variation in manure,” said University of Wisconsin-Platteville’s Chris Baxter during his presentation

Welcome to the Journal of Nutrient Management magazine, brought to you by the publisher of Hoard’s Dairyman and Hay & Forage Grower magazines

My family’s dairy farm is located in Eastern Wisconsin and sits in a spot with heavy clay soil. It’s the kind of red clay that, after a rainfall, sticks to your shoes and weighs you down so